IP352W14A Programming Basics – Session Four Notes

Consider this picture.
Learning Cycle

Can you see how this applies to what you are doing before our sessions and while we are together?

Please reply with a comment about our fourth session.

Highlights / Metacognition

  • What did you think was the most valuable thing that happened for you tonight?
  • What did you learn from that?
  • What will you do with that knowledge?

Questions?

  • Now that we’ve had our fourth session, what do you want to know?
  • What could we have done better?

If you spot a question from someone else and you can answer it – please do.

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23 thoughts on “IP352W14A Programming Basics – Session Four Notes

  1. Alpha Lam says:

    What did you think was the most valuable thing that happened for you tonight?
    The most valuable part of the evening was experiencing the process of learning, from struggling to learn to finally understanding what I have been trying to learn.

    What did you learn from that?
    It was really powerful to see that perseverance (continuously attempting to understand) and patience (acknowledging that I will not understand immediately and that I will receive more information that will make things clearer) allowed me to make sense of Powershell and Javascript.

    What will you do with that knowledge?
    Keep trying! While it is important to keep trying so that I can get the most out of this class, I should also observe and address how this resistance to learning exists in other aspects of my life.

    Questions?
    Now that we’ve had our fourth session, what do you want to know?
    How can I find more code in different languages to practice understanding?

    What could we have done better?
    Continue to reference what we have learned in new concepts and contexts and to alternate hands-on learning with conceptual discussions.

    Comments
    I found it extremely helpful to run through metaphors together for all the new terms that we will have to define on our own in the next 165 hours. Thanks!

  2. Demian says:

    Highlights / Metacognition

    Q: What did you think was the most valuable thing that happened for you tonight?
    A: Referential Database structure has always been an unspeakable mystery to me; I’ve built lots of sweet databases, but I have never been able to communicate how they are structured. I feel like the picture is starting to make more sense to me; and that it might be simpler than I anticipated.

    Q: What did you learn from that?
    A: I learned about agile vs. waterfall development models, some stuff about arrays, overall I am developing a more grounded understanding of the context of programming.

    Q: What will you do with that knowledge?
    A: I’m in the middle of a waterfall structured project with no defined requirements; I will redouble my efforts to find a paddle.

    Q: Questions?
    A: What are the pitfalls of an Agile approach? Perhaps with some commentary on examples of successful and unsuccessful agile developed products.

    Q: Now that we’ve had our fourth session, what do you want to know?
    A: I’m interested learning how one would approach programming in HTML Canvas (if that’s even a thing) and Web GL.

    Q: What could we have done better?
    A: Clearly, we could all stand to improve our cat rendering skills.

    ;D

  3. Most Valuable?

    Getting a more in-depth look at different programming languages. My eyes are still glossing over when I see a mess of HTML, but I’m starting to understand some more cause and effect.

    What did I learn?

    Perseverance. I shouldn’t be put off when something looks really complicated. If I don’t get something, read through the code slowly and try and work it out logically.

    What will I do with that knowledge?

    I just need to keep this perseverance in mind going forward. I want to be able to read code like I can read English, but I am a long way from being there. I can’t get frustrated and give up.

    Questions?

    Are we going to get any intro into CSS?

    Do better?

    I really like having some hands on with code, but I’d like a chance to build something complex from the ground up (if that makes sense). So, maybe the whole class builds something together step by step.

  4. Vanessa Legazpi says:

    What did you think was the most valuable thing that happened for you tonight?

    As mentioned above, becoming more familiar with the different types of programming languages has made it easier for me to read HTML. This has also helped me understand what does what and how it all coincides together.

    What did you learn from that?

    Although I have a lot more to learn about programming languages and even HTML, like I said, I have a better sense/understanding of how to read these pages.

    What will you do with that knowledge?

    I will keep this knowledge in mind whenever I am dealing with any type of website or code. On a side note, I actually had this happen to me today where I had to look at websites page source and was able to understand, or have an idea, of what was actually going on.

  5. Liz Gosselin says:

    What did you think was the most valuable thing that happened for you tonight?

    I’m enjoying the tour of the various languages and their syntax, as well as the different programs available to edit them.

    What did you learn from that?

    How similar they sort of look. The syntax and order changes, but in the end, with a little patience, you can decipher what it’s supposed to do.

    What will you do with that knowledge?

    It’s encouraging to know that coding is not as a mysterious art as I thought.

    Here’s another link to How to draw a cat:

    http://www.wikihow.com/Draw-a-Cat

  6. John J. says:

    What did you think was the most valuable thing? What did you learn from that?

    There were three things for me that I found very valuable from this class (1) A better understanding of how JavaScript integrates with HTML, (2) The overview of PowerShell and the difference between the uses of something more front-end oriented (JS) vs. back-end (Powershell), and (3) the interaction between spreadsheets and basic overview of SQL was insightful.

    What will you do with that knowledge?

    This information will be applied to provide a better understanding of a variety of IT projects currently underway at my work; specifically, there is a database development project that is currently underway and the basic SQL overview helped to contextual the objective.

    What would I like more of?

    Well, I will also research this myself, but I would like more information on the plain-language examples of where the various programming languages are used – and why a specific language is used for a specific function. For example, where can I find a specific example of PHP, and when is it advantageous to use PHP over JavaScript (I don’t know if that even makes sense…but it’s sort of my point, as well).

    Overall Great class – thank you.

  7. Sergio Vera says:

    Jim.
    For me is very interesting know how works the different programming languages. Maybe I will not do the programming on my future business web pages, but I want to learn the most of this.
    I don´t have the basics in this matter, so I would like if you take more time to explain the base of the different languages, to understand them in a better way. I had a good time in all classes.

  8. pamelakimlee says:

    What did you think was the most valuable thing that happened for you tonight?
    Starting to get a better idea of how to read code. The light is starting to go on, although it’s still pretty dim.

    What did you learn from that?
    Not to overstate the obvious but it is “a code”. It’s seems like deciphering a puzzle – and there are different styles.

    What will you do with that knowledge?
    Pick a code style that makes the most sense to me to learn and use. This should help with deciphering other codes too.
    Now that we’ve had our fourth session, what do you want to know?
    What I need to know to program a website. What kinds of programs or processes are used to do design websites. And which programs are best of breed.

    What could we have done better?
    Someone asked for one of the code lines to be read as “plain english”. I got what you were saying but another analogy was used rather then a “literal translation”. That being said, I do like the analogies and visual aids to help gain a better understanding of what’s being taught.

  9. Carmen says:

    most valuable thing that happened: learning about databases and SQL

    what I learned: SQL was something that I heard about but never understood and for the longest time I thought it was the same thing as a database. It’s nice to see that the language is actually very readable and the syntax [or at least the little that we saw] was very simple as well.

    how I will use this knowledge: I now understand where a piece of code from a previous class came from, and I can use this knowledge to query information from databases and then parse the information with other programming languages.

    What else I want to know: I want to know a bit more about Agile software development, specifically the pros and cons with this approach.

    • JimUBC says:

      Hi Carmen,
      Please see the course website, session 4 notes. There are some links to more information about Agile Software Development and a link to get a free book courtesy of IBM.

  10. Olga Frolova says:

    What did you think was the most valuable thing that happened for you tonight?
    It become easier for me to understand HTML and other languages.
    What did you learn from that?
    That all programming languages have something similar.
    What will you do with that knowledge?
    I hope to achieve a goal of the course and start read different programming languages.

  11. Elvina Balcyte says:

    I got to know that programming languages are like actual language groups . If you fluent at one language it is going to be easier to learn another language. Lets say if you speak Spanish you will understand Portuguese.
    I like that this course contains wide variety topics and different programming languages. Now i need to choose what course take next!

  12. Tony Koo says:

    What did you think was the most valuable thing that happened for you tonight?
    Discovering how if you know the general concepts you are able to somewhat decipher what might be happening in other languages.

    What did you learn from that?
    understanding general concepts can help you with any language. I also learned that style plays a very big role in programming, there are many ways of accomplishing the exact same thing.

    I also learned how scripting complements HTML and that you can use Programming Languages to write HTML.

    What will you do with that knowledge?
    I now can take a peek at other peoples code and figure out what’s going on there. I’m going to be taking some other courses as part of the certificate so this is a great foundation.

    What can we do better?
    I liked the in-class hands on exercises but I’m wondering if we will get to write something from scratch together. Doesn’t have to be fancy but to create something from a “blank page” would be fun.

  13. What did you think was the most valuable thing that happened for you tonight?

    For me, there were three valuable things: (a) The Waterfall Model vs Agile Software Development Model to software development. (b) Windows PowerShell Scripting and (c) the introduction to understanding the concept of Object Oriented Programming.

    What did you learn from that?

    That the Waterfall Model is easier to understand compared to learning Agile Software Development Model. The same can be said about Procedural Language and Object Oriented Programming.

    What will you do with that knowledge?

    I will certainly continue to focus on understanding and mastering both the Agile Software Development Model and Object Oriented Programming because in today’s world of computers and applications, you must learn, know and use the concepts of OOP to be successful at programming.

    Questions?

    Do all of today’s Programmers google “How do you ….” because they don’t know or understand how it could be done or are they just overwhelmed with too much work? Do they not try to figure out and do some critical thinking so that they can solve a problem? Isn’t this just the lazy way of working? We are thought to be critical thinkers in this course, yet you have Programmers googling “How do you …” That’s somewhat of an oxymoron.

    Now that we’ve had our fourth session, what do you want to know?

    Continue with understanding OOP and building together an easy application from scratch using methods from the Agile Software Development Model. This might be asking too much, but it would be great hands on experience.

    What could we have done better?

    Nothing. There’s a great balance in in-class learning and the various references to out of class reading material.

  14. Dusanka says:

    What did you think was the most valuable thing that happened for you tonight?
    The most valuable thing was looking through the HTML script. Figuring out what the code will do before running it and learning that there are multiple (and quite different) ways to achieve basically the same thing when coding.

    What did you learn from that?
    I learned that to practice understanding programming and coding it is helpful to look through code that someone else wrote and try to figure out exactly what the output will be. Also, that one person may achieve the same output in a completely different way than someone else, and that you need to understand this when coding and when choosing where to add comments.

    What will you do with this knowledge?
    I will try to keep in mind that comments are very important when programming and will try my best to always add sufficient comments so someone else looking at my code will understand what I tried to do. I will also help myself learn better by looking at code written by someone else and trying to decipher what it is supposed to do – use this method as a learning device.

  15. Heather Mitchell says:

    What did you think was the most valuable thing that happened for you tonight?
    Realizing that the syntax of code isn’t something to get too obsessive over at first. The more important thing is learning to think logically through a problem to lay the tracks for code.

    What did you learn from that? What will you do with that knowledge?
    I learned not to worry about which language I should learn first, and instead, persist with learning the logic of code.

  16. Shane says:

    Most Valuable?

    I am beginning to understand the structures of the languages again and see how to approach a problem in the right frame of mind.

    What did I learn?

    I realized that we were looking at multiple language examples throughout last 2 classes which was a relief. I was having trouble seeing why certain problems were answered in different ways.

    What will I do with that knowledge?

    Start applying my understanding and building on it. Discussing with people in work and getting insight.

    Questions?

    Will we be learning CSS or HTML?

    Do better?

    Less reading articles and writing essays and more practical work like writing problems for homework.

  17. Courtnae says:

    Highlights / Metacognition

    What did you think was the most valuable thing that happened for you tonight?

    Looking at the different coding languages.

    What did you learn from that?

    I learned that with enough time and determination I can decipher the meaning behind the syntax.

    What will you do with that knowledge?

    Remind myself to not get frustrated if at first I am not comprehending what I am looking at. Maybe it is time to take a break and come back with fresh eyes.

    Questions?

    Now that we’ve had our fourth session, what do you want to know?

    Are we going to look at more complex coding languages?

  18. I appreciated that we reviewed the syntax and compared the two scripting languages – JavaScript and PowerShell -side by side. This solidified for me the importance of first building the logical model of your program. Jim, I understand better now your comment that writing a great program starts with a pen and paper.
    Our scripting exercises also made me realize how easy it is to make a logical error in your program and how incredibly hard it could be to detect that you have made an error and where.

  19. Jennifer says:

    Lesson 4 comments:
    What I took away from week four is that the Waterfall vs Agile differences in development styles is making more sense. I enjoy all the readings and the factors are beginning to come together where I can begin to form my own opinions on how to program. Relating it back to the first readings which spoke to the need for building first, I feel like I now understand where that writer is coming from at bit more. Perhaps I’m not getting the point, but it seems that the Waterfall programming idea is a more silo type method that doesn’t necessarily share the requirements and design side with others, whereas Agile methods would have a more collective input in the effort.

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