IP352W14A Programming Basics – Session Five Notes

Consider this picture.
Learning Cycle

Can you see how this applies to what you are doing before our sessions and while we are together?

Please reply with a comment about our fifth session.

Highlights / Metacognition

  • What did you think was the most valuable thing that happened for you tonight?
  • What did you learn from that?
  • What will you do with that knowledge?

Questions?

  • Now that we’ve had our fifth session, what do you want to know?
  • What could we have done better?

If you spot a question from someone else and you can answer it – please do.

 

Here’s a link to the rest of Assignment Five

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13 thoughts on “IP352W14A Programming Basics – Session Five Notes

  1. Alpha Lam says:

    What did you think was the most valuable thing that happened for you tonight?
    It was extremely helpful to hear Courtnae’s ah-ha moment about encapsulation in the example of the browser alert.

    What did you learn from that?
    I learned how a definition we were trying to explain exists in a real world application.

    What will you do with that knowledge?
    Review the terms I defined last week and add examples.

    Now that we’ve had our fifth session, what do you want to know?
    Why do we have assignments—which I assume are at least partially graded on accuracy—defining terms that we discuss in a following class as opposed to learning the terms, getting an opportunity to ask questions, etc. in class, and then having assignments where we find the terms existing in code?

    What could we have done better?
    I find it helpful to see as many examples as possible of what we are trying to learn in code, even if it looks different in languages or situations. This helps me relate new information to information I already have a good understanding of, so that I can see how something exists in relation to other things or how something behaves or deviates from typical behaviour. While the assignments to define terms encourage research, I find it difficult to gain an adequate understanding of the concepts on my own and on time for the assignment deadline which was demoralizing for me last week.

  2. Vanessa Legazpi says:

    What did you think was the most valuable thing that happened for you tonight?

    Group work as we were able to define technical terms in a non-technical way as well as have numerous different takes on these terms.

    What did you learn from that?

    As Alpha mentioned above, I now better understand technical terms as the class was able to associate these words with real life examples.

    What will you do with that knowledge?

    Keep it in mind when doing work for this course and potentially for the rest of my certificate program.

  3. Courtnae says:

    Highlights / Metacognition

    What did you think was the most valuable thing that happened for you tonight?

    The example of the pop-up window – It totally made sense to me and it also took some of the pressure off that I was feeling.

    What did you learn from that?

    I don’t have to know how everything works in coding, that there is still some magic in this world 🙂

    What will you do with that knowledge?

    Try not to be so hard on myself. I know this isn’t directly related to Programming per se, but it pervades my life so it fits in for me here too.

    Questions?

    Now that we’ve had our fifth session, what do you want to know?

    How are we being graded in this class? I didn’t complete the last assignment due to family and physical issues that occurred – is that taken into account?

  4. Carmen says:

    Most valuable thing that happened: The group discussions about different terms in OOP

    What I learned: different ways of thinking about and defining OOP terms. I have a better understanding of this concept now.

    What I will do with that knowledge: When solving future programming problems, I can decide whether or not OOP is the way to go or if the non-OOP approach would be better.

    What I still want to know: I wish we could’ve gotten a few examples of what languages are object-oriented and the difference between OOP and non-OOP and the advantages & disadvantages of both.

  5. Liz Gosselin says:

    Highlights / Metacognition

    What did you think was the most valuable thing that happened for you tonight?

    Getting a better idea how the technical terms we had to define relate to examples. The discussion in groups was useful.

    What did you learn from that?
    I have a clearer idea of polymorphism, among other terms.

    What will you do with that knowledge?
    Better understand how components of a program fit together.

  6. Jonathon Sanson says:

    What was the most valuable thing:
    Today we reinforced the ideas central to the OOP through physical examples and visual metaphors. We also did some group work trying to pin down the definitive key words.

    What I learned:
    I think I have a better understanding now of the terms.

    What I will do with that:
    I am going to take another look at my explanation for a 6 year old.

    What I would still like to know:
    I think that this course has provided me with a high level view of programming. The readings, in class work and the assignments have helped me to get a better understanding of the things the important considerations of project management, planning and I look forward to more practical understanding and application of code in the JS courses offered under the HTML5 certificate program.

  7. What did you think was the most valuable thing that happened for you tonight?

    I definitely got a better handle on the core concepts of OOP. It all started coming together as we got our hands on the basic code in the last hour or so.

    What did you learn from that?

    Well, to be honest, I was finding the logic of programming to be backward and mad. I’m used to difficult logic and grammar, but computers don’t seem to think like people. I actually feel like I’m starting to ‘get’ the logic of code, which is really valuable.

    What will you do with that knowledge?

    I know that I’m not going to be a super class-A coder, but I do intent to work with programmers effectively. I’d like to be able to understand the scope of projects, the requirements and possibilities, and to know when I’m having the wool pulled over my eyes…

    Questions?

    I would also like to know how these assignments are going to be graded.

    Now that we’ve had our fifth session, what do you want to know?

    Anything to do with coding. More coding.

    What could we have done better?

    I appreciate the intention of the abstract, high level demonstration Jim put on. I can see how it was intended to bridge a difficult concept for the unfamiliar, but I don’t know that it was entirely effective. I don’t feel like the logic of programming really exists outside of programming, and relating it to real world examples wasn’t effective for me. I really did start to understand it better when we looked at code, see the relational aspects of it, and what result certain concepts had in the language of code. That was just me, though. I can understand if others got it quicker than me.

  8. What did you think was the most valuable thing that happened for you tonight?

    Analyzing function addTwo(first,second)

    What did you learn from that?

    You can continue to improve and alter any function until you get the expected results.

    What will you do with that knowledge?

    Create a function of my own.

    Questions?

    Getting into the structure of a function. “Return” was new and wasn’t really talked about? Is “Return” always needed in a function? Is “function” the indicator of the start of a function and “return” the end of a function? … they are paired up to make up the whole of a function?

    Now that we’ve had our fifth session, what do you want to know?

    Can we spend more time on functions …. going line by line on any specific function so that all of the students understand.

    What could we have done better?

    Talking more about the window.prompt (i.e. size, location) when using function addTwo(first,second).

    • Answered my own question with regards to “return” … sometimes we want our function to return a value back to where the call was made. And that’s exactly what we were doing with that function we looked at.

  9. Elvina Balcyte says:

    What did you think was the most valuable thing that happened for you tonight?
    I got to know more about Object Oriented Programming. I have more clear understanding about definitions.
    What did you learn from that?
    I learned about OOP definitions through real life examples. I still want to know how it looks in actual code.
    What will you do with that knowledge?
    I will try to write little bit of code.

    I would like to see more hands on examples not only theory. Other than that I am enjoying lectures.

  10. I finally got what encapsulation is.
    During the discussion with the group, I realized that my problem wasn’t with the concept of encapsulation itself. I had understood the approach of separating some data in its own module. What confused me was what is happening with that data after that. Sitting on its own, it is not very useful. I wasn’t really getting that you can still access that data through public methods. Your drawing of the black box with the little tiny window at the end of the class really helped me understand that..

  11. Jennifer says:

    Hi Jim,
    Week 5 was a little intimidating and I thought I was totally lost, but after a lot of reading and imagining, I think I’m beginning to see how we moved from procedural programming in the first week (by making the detailed list of instructions) to object oriented programming (OOP) now (with our assignment this week of class:human).

    I found the example in class of the shop-keeper with apron of widgets and dice useful. Particularly when it came to the assignment this week of creating the class:human and expanding on that. Keeping the class example in mind, and then looking at co-students wikis helped a lot in my general understanding of how OOP concepts are related.

    What I will probably take away from this is the desire to try looking at more real life situations like OOP problems. For example, if I’m bored on the skytrain, I’ll look around and start defining properties of the people in the skytrain car, how many cars the train is made up of, etc. I don’t believe I have a firm grasp yet on it all, but the desire to look around and try the assignment more than once is there.

  12. pamelakimlee says:

    A bit OT. How accurate is programming portrayed in current movies and TV?

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