IP352F14A – Programming Mindset & Mechanics Session Two Notes

Consider this picture.

Learning Cycle

Can you see how this applies to what you are doing before our sessions and while we are together?

Please reply with a comment about our second session.

Highlights / Metacognition

  • What did you think was the most valuable thing that happened for you tonight?
  • What did you learn from that?
  • What will you do with that knowledge?

Questions?

  • Now that we’ve had our second session, what do you want to know?
  • What could we have done better?

If you spot a question from someone else and you can answer it – please do.

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12 thoughts on “IP352F14A – Programming Mindset & Mechanics Session Two Notes

  1. Remy Vaillancourt says:

    What did you think was the most valuable thing that happened for you tonight?
    The most valuable thing was to realize the correlation between the users and the programmers . The differences between front and back end.

    What did you learn from that?
    That there are real distinction between those people and not everybody who study in web design will have the same pathway. Some of them will be working straight with the client and other will mainly focus on the programming aspect of it.

    What will you do with that knowledge?
    It will define more with career and who I want to be in this giant industry.

    Now that we’ve had our second session, what do you want to know:
    I want to know more about how a person from the front end can interact with the client. Graphic?
    What could we have done better?
    I couldn’t say what could we have done better but more real example of works in the industry would be valuable.

    • JimUBC says:

      Hi Remy,

      I want to know more about how a person from the front end can interact with the client. Graphic?

      Watch for the discussion in the third session on User Centred Design.

  2. Jay Seabrook says:

    Q: What did you think was the most valuable thing that happened for you tonight?

    A: I appreciated the ‘Lego’ and ‘Duplo’ analogies for programming/coding; Lego is for more intricacy and detail whereas Duplo (larger) is for larger, quicker, simpler jobs for people with less technical experience.

    Q: What did you learn from that?

    A: Early web developers were more or less Duplo workers. Duplo is the scripting, whereas Lego is compiled programming. The modern version of the web is a hybrid of Lego and Duplo… Lego people have taken Lego functionality and have figured out ways to make it work for Duplo sites and applications.

    Q: What will you do with that knowledge?

    A: Just a nice reference point for future learning that was easy to grasp. Simple analogies work well for me lol.

    Q: Now that we’ve had our second session, what do you want to know?

    A: Not sure if we’re going to tackle it in this course but it’d be cool to actually take a crack at coding at some point.

    Q: What could we have done better?

    A: No suggestions…

  3. Q: What did you think was the most valuable thing that happened for you tonight?

    A: I appreciated the ‘Lego’ and ‘Duplo’ analogies also. It helped me understand the major differences between two programing languages and how one can help improve the other regarding the smaller details.

    Q: What did you learn from that?
    A: I learned that while there are benefits for using specific languages of code, the time it takes to build a website being the major benefit. Those benefits some times come at a price, that being you lose the details. By combining the codes you can sometimes bring the two worlds together.

    Q: What will you do with that knowledge?

    A: It gave me a better understanding of what is involved for website creation and I hope to learn as much as possible to become one of the best in the industry.

    Q: Now that we’ve had our second session, what do you want to know?

    A: I would like to know more about JavaScript and how it is applied. I’d also like to get a better understanding of all the tools available when writing coded HTML or other. When writing code is it a process of just trial and error or is there a template one always goes by?

    Q: What could we have done better?

    A: You seem to have worked out all the bugs that evening, and everything went rather well.

    • JimUBC says:

      Hey James,
      It’s good to see that you got connected to the wiki and were able to participate fully in the research and interaction with the others in the group.

  4. Maga says:

    What did you think was the most valuable thing that happened for you tonight?
    I understood the difference between front end and back end programming.

    What did you learn from that?
    That these are two separate yet complementary “worlds”.

    What will you do with that knowledge?
    If I end up learning how to program at some point, I will be able to choose which “end” I want to program for and which tools (languages) I need to learn.

    Now that we’ve had our second session, what do you want to know?
    I would like to learn more about the differences between the various languages.

    • JimUBC says:

      Hi Maga,
      We will talk about the differences between languages in more detail this week. That will be easier to do now that understand the terminology that you researched this week.

  5. jencrothers33783523 says:

    <>
    I found the discussion of Lego and Duplo the most valuable. (I was very interested in stateful and statelessness but I’m not sure how valuable that will be for me.)

    <>
    It’s not that either is the “best” or “right” way but each can be appropriate in different circumstances. When I want to create a website I usually go to WordPress (and more recently Squarespace) to get it done in a Duplo way. I may not have micro-control as with Lego but they are quick and easy and do a “good enough” job.

    <>
    Using it to decide whether it’s a Lego job or a Duplo job.

    <>
    I’d like to do some practical work.

    <>
    Reviewing the Study section there seems to be a lot of content that we didn’t cover. Perhaps that was deliberate?

    • JimUBC says:

      Hi Jen,
      We touched on most of the topics in the Study section although in some cases it was a brief introduction that we will pursue this week. We did not talk about User Centred Design but we will do that this week.

  6. James Chan says:

    What did you think was the most valuable thing that happened for you tonight?

    The most valuable thing was hearing a run-down history of what us web designers/developers have experienced in our careers so far. It was neat to step back and realize, from outside looking in, what actual change I have personally experienced, and the order in which it happened. From creating static, copy-paste style websites using tables, to working on full blown intranet, styling it with CSS and enhancing the front end with jQuery script.

    What did you learn from that?

    That I have been adapting and changing with the times and technology.

    What will you do with that knowledge?

    Do my best to understand and learn the basics so I can better understand this technology to advance myself.

    Questions?

    Now that we’ve had our second session, what do you want to know?

    I am interested for our next session. Learning more about functions, arrays, variables, etc. I experience this a lot in my current job so am interested in learning about them further and how they work together.

    What could we have done better?

    Not a thing, presentation is easy going at a pace I can follow.

  7. Jamie Stockdale says:

    What did you think was the most valuable thing that happened for you tonight?
    I learned about the differences in front-end and back-end programming, which is important for me as though I am every interested in the processes that go into back-end programming, I think my forte would be dealing with the clients, and thus more in the front-end of the spectrum.

    What did you learn from that?
    Because of this, I learned that I will likely want to apply myself at the front-end programming skills necessary to deliver high quality work to clients. That said, I’d want to get some of the fundamentals of work on back-end programming so that I can accurately understand what is being done, as this would be an asset for me to help the client understand the process they have embarks upon. No one likes asking questions to a consultant thr they don’t have answers for. Though I would never be able to field them all, I’d like to skim some of those questions to save someone on the back-end from wasting their time answering a seemingly simple question.

    What will you do with that knowledge?
    I am going to apply myself and understanding the front-end of the shop, and make sur I get the core concepts dialed, so I can use any time between jobs to deepen my understanding of the back-end processes I am making use of.
    Questions?
    Which languages should I learn? What are the most fundamental front-end languages I should be familiar with. If I am limited on time, what back-end languages would be really good to learn in order to get the gist of back-end processes?

    Now that we’ve had our second session, what do you want to know?
    As above the key languages I’d need to focus on to have a good grip of the front-end, while maintaining a basic understanding of the back end.

    What could we have done better?
    I think we were pretty comprehensive in our coverage. Perhaps answering the questions above might’ve been nice, but I am not sure there would have been enough class time, and I thought class time was really well balanced last class.

    • JimUBC says:

      Hi Jamie,

      I hope that you’ll bring up these questions tonight in our third session.

      Questions?
      Which languages should I learn? What are the most fundamental front-end languages I should be familiar with. If I am limited on time, what back-end languages would be really good to learn in order to get the gist of back-end processes?

      Now that we’ve had our second session, what do you want to know?
      As above the key languages I’d need to focus on to have a good grip of the front-end, while maintaining a basic understanding of the back end.

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